Martin Börjesson

Do we really believe in science: the emergence of truthiness

In an article in the Guardian the other day Georg Monbiot wonders why climate change denial is spreading in spite of what the scientific community states: A survey last month by the Pew Research Centre suggests that the proportion of Americans who believe there’s solid evidence that the world has been warming over the past few decades has fallen from 71% to 57% in just 18 months(1).

Nine areas of change, which are “rewinding” our society (to the Middle Ages)?

Since we can trace the birth of many of our defining concept of this society back to the end of the middle ages, why not try to mirror what is happening today in how the world looked like then? Here is X things that I have collected which sometimes seems to be rewinded: Organizing The decline of the nation state as the dominant organizing principle Hierarchical structures are challenged by the open spaces and market way of organizing things – innovation Knowledge and world view Increasingly relativistic view of knowledge – broadcasting model is challenged and is losing it’s politically and socially defining qualities The decline of the idea of a better future – the idea of progress The text-based knowledge society is challenged by a world of verbally told stories and images Breakdown of the quantitative perspective and re-emergence of a qualitative world view and geographical perspective – death of distance, valuing the people and the experience of a specific place without so much romancing about how far away it is from home’ Re-emergence of the risk society – the world out there is a dangerous place and we need to be protected Value creation Re-emergence of a non money value exchange systems – open source, make, prosumtion Break down of the immaterial ownership logic, where